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The New York Times

When Progressive Ideals Become a Luxury | NYT Opinion

The New York Times 23 hours ago

The New York Times  at george magazine

In a 2017 Senate hearing, the Harvard sociologist Robert Putnam famously argued, “Rich kids and poor kids now grow up in separate Americas.” Rob Henderson knows this firsthand. His mother was addicted to drugs; he never knew his father. He grew up shuttling among foster homes, where he started drinking beer around age 5 and smoking marijuana at age 9. At age 17 he watched a drunk friend kick a dog off a cliff and knew he had to escape. He enlisted in the Air Force.

When Henderson got to Yale on the G.I. Bill, he was shocked by the differences between him and his classmates. As he explains in the video above, he learned it was popular for his classmates to hold strong, seemingly progressive views about many of the concerns that shaped his life — drugs, marriage, crime. But they were largely insulated from the consequences of their views. Henderson found that these ideas came to serve as status symbols for the privileged while they, ironically, kept the working class down. He came to call these ideas luxury beliefs.

Henderson went on to get his Ph.D. at Cambridge and wrote a book about his experiences, “Troubled: A Memoir of Family, Foster Care, and Social Class.” In the video, Henderson argues that these out-of-touch views are all around us, widening our class divide and fueling our fractious politics. And he envisions another way.

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Whether it's reporting on conflicts abroad and political divisions at home, or covering the latest style trends and scientific developments, New York Times video journalists provide a revealing and unforgettable view of the world. It's all the news that's fit to watch.

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I Went From Foster Care to Yale. This Is What I Learned About ‘Luxury Beliefs.’ | NYT Opinion

The New York Times 23 hours ago

Jonathan Pie: 'It's 50 Shades of Beige.' Meet Britain's New Prime Minister. | NYT Opinion #uk

The New York Times July 5, 2024 11:02 am

Jonathan Pie: 'It's 50 Shades of Beige.' Meet Britain's New Prime Minister. | NYT Opinion

The New York Times July 5, 2024 11:00 am

The New York Times  at george magazine

It's a battle inside the mind to prevent one young girl’s thoughts from being overrun by anxiety in this scene from “Inside Out 2.”

The sequel once again sets the bulk of its action inside the mind of Riley, who this time around is contending with the onset of puberty. Her emotions are still anthropomorphized by a colorful collection of characters, but with a new stage of adolescence comes an additional cast of emotions. Anxiety (voiced by Maya Hawke) arrives in the form of a wild-looking orange creature with a busy plume and a tendency to overreact.

In this scene, Anxiety is directing a room full of mind workers to draw up projections of everything that could go wrong in Riley’s big hockey match the next day, keeping the girl tossing in her sleep at each negative thought.

Narrating the scene, the film’s director, Kelsey Mann, says, “I always envisioned this being a movie about anxiety taking over, and was reflecting on my own life and how my anxiety does that in me.”

As things become overwhelming, Joy (voiced by Amy Poehler) infiltrates Anxiety’s plan and begins to draw up positive projections to send to Riley to make her feel better. As she tries to get the mind workers to rise up against Anxiety, a number of film references come into play, from “Norma Rae” to “Jerry Maguire,” with a little bit of “Network” thrown in.

Read the "Inside Out 2" review here: https://nyti.ms/4bqZ4MR
Subscribe: http://bit.ly/U8Ys7n
More from The New York Times Video: http://nytimes.com/video
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Whether it's reporting on conflicts abroad and political divisions at home, or covering the latest style trends and scientific developments, New York Times video journalists provide a revealing and unforgettable view of the world. It's all the news that's fit to watch.

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How ‘Inside Out 2’ Battles Anxiety | Anatomy of a Scene

The New York Times June 28, 2024 5:00 pm

How Biden and Trump Need to Perform Tonight | NYT Opinion #debate

The New York Times June 27, 2024 5:02 pm

What Trump and Biden Must Do to Win the Debate | NYT Opinion

The New York Times June 27, 2024 5:00 pm

Nuclear Testing Victims Speak Out: 'I Have Poison in My Blood' | NYT Opinion

The New York Times June 20, 2024 5:00 pm

Nuclear Testing Victims Speak Out | NYT Opinion #nuclearwar

The New York Times June 20, 2024 5:00 pm

The New York Times  at george magazine

Actions speak louder, and more flirtatiously, than words in this key sequence from “Hit Man,” the rom-com thriller from Richard Linklater now streaming on Netflix.

During the movie’s screenings at film festivals last year, this particular scene had audiences erupting with applause for the feat that it pulls off. It’s “kind of a performance within a performance within a performance,” Linklater says in his narration.

At this point in the movie, the lead character, Gary Johnson (Glen Powell), is at a turning point. He has been working undercover with the New Orleans Police Department as a hit man named Ron. In that role, he developed a secret romantic relationship with a woman who initially tried to solicit Ron for his services. Her name is Madison (Adria Arjona) and she was going to hire Ron to kill her abrasive husband, but Ron talks her out of it.

Madison’s husband later ends up dead, and the police think that Madison is the killer. One of the officers, Jasper (Austin Amelio) has seen Gary and Madison together in public and has suspicions about what’s going on with the two. He decides to put a wire on Gary and send him to talk with Madison in the hopes of creating an entrapment scenario. But to save Madison (and himself), Gary thinks fast and comes up with a way to warn Madison that they are under surveillance.

He types out information to her through his Notes app on his phone and directs her through what to say, and not say, in their conversation, in an exchange that is both sexy and flirty, while also being a tense high-wire act.

“It’s fun to see your hero, the guy you’re invested in, kind of figure his way out of a really sticky, tight situation that I don’t think any of us would be quick enough to find a way out of,” Linklater says.

“It’s a dance, and it’s just fun to see them figure it out as they go.”

Read the New York Times review: nyti.ms/3yYNlHH
Subscribe: http://bit.ly/U8Ys7n
More from The New York Times Video: http://nytimes.com/video
----------
Whether it's reporting on conflicts abroad and political divisions at home, or covering the latest style trends and scientific developments, New York Times video journalists provide a revealing and unforgettable view of the world. It's all the news that's fit to watch.

YouTube Video VVVxbmJERmRDcHVOOENNRWcwVnVFQnFBLjhTX0ctbWtfa09V

Watch Glen Powell and Adria Arjona Fight and Flirt in ‘Hit Man’ | Anatomy of a Scene

The New York Times June 14, 2024 8:00 pm

Lets Talk About Periods | NYT Opinion

The New York Times June 11, 2024 5:02 pm

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